Final findings from Force Science exhaustion study

FORCE SCIENCE LOGOFinal findings from Force Science exhaustion study

The Force Science research team that explored officer exhaustion through a unique set of experiments –with these significant conclusions:

• Less than 60 seconds of all-out exertion, such as an officer might expend in trying to control a combative offender, can deplete the average LEO’s physical reserves and put his life in peril;

• Environmental awareness and memory are also affected adversely, hampering an involved officer’s ability to deliver accurate, detailed statements and testimony once a desperate fight is over;

• Even officers in top condition are not immune to the rapid drain of physical prowess and cognitive faculties resulting from sustained hand-to-hand combat.

“The bottom line,” says Dr. Bill Lewinski, executive director of the Force Science Institute who headed up the research team, “is this: If an officer can’t resolve a struggle very quickly, a tactical withdrawal or swift escalation to a higher level of force may be necessary and justified for personal survival. And investigators and courts need to understand that an officer who doesn’t provide details surrounding a major physical conflict is not necessarily being deceptive, malicious, or uncooperative.”

Read more about the study here: FORCE SCIENCE EXHAUSTION & MEMORY STUDY

WATCH AND READ THE CTV COVERAGE HERE

WATCH AND READ THE CBA COVERAGE HERE